The Value of Having Core Values

The airline passenger was upset with the flight crew. So she wrote a letter to the CEO to inform him she did not approve of how the crew was making jokes while doing the pre-flight safety checks.

In her letter to the CEO, she made clear that security announcements ought to be taken serious because of how important they were.

 

Airline Customer Service Values Core Values Business CultureAs it turns out, the passenger that wrote the letter was a frequent flyer of the airline. Surely a customer the airline wants to keep. Right? So how did the CEO respond?

“We’ll miss you” and added, “Rest assured that this company, like all good airlines, take safety very, very seriously.”

Most CEOs would have probably sent an apology letter saying things like it was not their intention to offend her; he’d look into to the matter; they value her opinion and appreciate her business. But not Southwest airline’s CEO.

What Can We Learn From The CEO’s Response?

There are many lessons in the Southwest story we can glean and apply to our practices. However, among the most valuable lesson for me, is the importance of having a set of defined core values.

Why Are Core Values Important?

Core values are used to establish a company’s guiding principles. They serve the distinct purpose of determining behavior and action.

Without core values, employees do not know what is right from wrong. Therefore, they have no choice but to make decisions based on their values. Which, of course, may or may not align with the company’s values.

However, when a business establishes them, they assist in determining the right path. Moreover, they give employees a reference in fulfilling business goals.

Southwest Airline’s Core Value

Embedded into Southwest’s company culture, is a set of core values. Here is how they define it for their employees:

We believe in Living the Southwest Way, which is to have a Warrior Spirit, a Servant’s Heart, and a Fun-LUVing Attitude.

No Apologies

For Southwest, working hard and playing harder is one of the company’s guiding principle. Fun is part of what the airline is all about. That is why the CEO did not apologize on behalf of the employees. The employees were embracing one of the company’s unwavering value.

Core Value For Salud Pediatrics

One of our practice’s cornerstone principles is profitability. This may seem obvious or inherent knowledge considering our practice is a small business.

But for us, profit is a core value because our financial gains are the driving force behind our ability to fulfill our mission to advocate and care for children in our community.

In other words, profitability is essential to our ability to provide health care services. Without it, we would not be able to stay open. Thus profitability is a responsibility to the community we serve, not merely a requirement for our business.

Prepared To Lose A Patient

Recently, a parent from our practice questioned our policy that requires patients to leave a credit card on file with our practice.

After explaining the reason for the policy and addressing her concerns about identity theft, the mom was still apprehensive.

I told her that her concerns were legitimate and that I understood where she was coming from, but that the policy was non-negotiable. I explained to mom that we felt so strong about the importance of the credit card policy, that we were willing to lose her family as patients.

Policies & Procedures vs. Core Values

We all have rules in place. Even Southwest, with their FUN-Luving attitude, has them. Going through the pre-flight safety announcements is one of many, I’m sure.

Having systems in place ensure efficiency and safety, among other things. But It is impossible to come up with a scheme for every single potential situation. There will always be situations that fall outside of the “policy.”

Core values, however, can be used in situations that fall outside the parameters of policies and procedures.

Does your practice have a core value statement?

If so, what does it say? Are you prepared to lose patients over it?

 


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Simple Yet Effective Leadership Lesson You Must Learn If You Are A Practice Administrator

Medical practices don’t sell products, transport goods, develop software or produce widgets in a factory. Our businesses are all about people. Consequently, the only way to improve productivity or enhance performance is by getting better at managing people.

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One day, his wife complained that in their 25 years of marriage, he had never told her that he loved her.

“I told you when we got married. I’ll let you know if it changes,” he replied.

Acknowledging staff members or affirming employees for a job well done doesn’t come naturally to me. I’m the kind of person that believes recognition isn’t necessary when someone does as expected.

YOU’RE SUPPOSED TO WORK HARD

For example, I’ve heard employees say, I worked hard for this company. This comment doesn’t deserve affirmation.

Why? Because the expectations is not to barely do mediocre average work. The expectation is that people work hard. Pronouncing you work hard is like a father publicly declaring he takes care of his kids.

WHEN IS TOO MUCH, TOO MUCH?

I also feel that if you praise a person for their good job often, the praise eventually loses value. Like the word thanks. It’s polite, but is one thankful every time we say thanks? So when I acknowledge someone’s behavior, character, work ethic, etc. it is because it truly exceeded expectation.

WHAT IS THAT ABOUT?

Here is the thing. As a member of the team (as opposed to the boss) I like to receive positive feedback. I like to get recognition, have someone acknowledge my work and accomplishments.

WE ALL NEED TO HEAR IT

I’m sure the wife in the story knew the husband loved her, but she needed to hear it from him. And just like the wife, people too need to hear from the person in charge words of appreciation even though they heard it once before.

The affirmation, praise, recognition, pat on the back (how ever you want to describe it) isn’t only for those in charge to give to their reports. This also applies to colleagues and peers.

Furthermore, I’d challenge those of you that have bosses, supervisors or managers to share words of encouragement as well. They need it just as much as you need it too.

HAS BRANDON GONE SOFT?

You may be wondering what this has to do with practice management, business, revenue, CPT codes or ICD10? A lot!

Medical practices don’t sell products, transport goods, develop software or produce widgets in a factory. Our businesses are all about people. Consequently, the only way to improve productivity or enhance performance is by getting better at managing people. And frequent reminders that show appreciation is one of the best way to become a great practice manager.

As it turns out, people that are recognized, appreciated and affirmed are far more productive, far more efficient, and far more happy than those that are not.

 


Do you regularly provide positive feedback to your employees? Do you provide positive feedback to your boss, manager or supervisor? If so, how do you prefer to affirm or show appreciation to the staff? A note by email, a handwritten note, publicly? I’d love to hear ways your practice engages employee.