How Well Do Parents Know What You Do As a Pediatrician?

It’s hard to appreciate the value that pediatricians provide when one is not aware of exactly what it is that pediatricians do.

During the summer months, I posted on our practice’s Facebook page, a note encouraging parents, to schedule their children’s wellness visits.

Although the message was for our entire Facebook community, I wanted to catch the eye of parents with teenagers. Don’t know how well you manage teens in your office, but in our office, we have decent wellness visit numbers with younger patients. The teen population?

Not so much. Once the teen years kick in, we mostly see them when they are sick.Screen Shot 2016-02-26 at 11.48.51 AM

I wanted to encourage parents to make their wellness visits but also throw in a subtle nudge to parents with teens.To get their attention, I opened with this line: Did you know pediatricians are trained to treat children from birth to adolescence? Then I went on to talk about the importance of wellness visits etc.

Something interesting happened. The post outperformed other Facebook post. It received more likes that than the ordinary. But that the surprise me. What surprised me the most, were the comments from parents.

One mom said, “it’s good to know the pediatrician can see my teen.”

Another said, ” Timothy is going to be so happy when I tell him Dr. B can still see him.”

WHAT WAS THE LESSON?

It’s an age-old lesson. It’s a lesson on assumptions and what happens when we make them.

That simple, otherwise ordinary status update, got me thinking about how well (or not) we communicate what it is that we do as pediatricians. If so many people weren’t aware that pediatricians can treat teens and beyond (0-21), what else don’t they know? The irony is that our website is tagged with the line “Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine.”

OPPORTUNITY

We clearly have a communication problem. And I would argue that our lack of proper communication about what it is we do as pediatricians (more than runny noses and giving shots) is why many parents don’t see the distinction between a retail clinic and a pediatrician.


 

It’s hard to appreciate the value that pediatricians provide when one is not aware of exactly what it is that pediatricians do.

 


 

The good news is that there is a significant opportunity for pediatricians to cover a lot of ground. How so? By using social media channels to educate our community about all the great services we are trained to provide.

I also believe that leveraging this opportunity could aid your practice in differentiating itself from the competition.

WHAT IS YOUR COMMUNICATION STRATEGY?

Since I realized there was a chasm between our assumptions and the reality, I’ve been intentional about informing our community about the training, knowledge and expertise our pediatricians can address.

Some of it may seem too obvious for those of us that do this every day. Like explaining the importance of wellness visits.

But the truth is, some parents don’t know about yearly wellness visits. They assume that because the child no longer needs shots, they don’t need to go to the doctor.

Beyond promoting wellness visits, I use many of the things included in the Bright Futures guidelines as a way to highlight that a visit to the pediatricians is highly comprehensive.

And by educating our population, I’m also marketing our practice in a unique way. Instead of mentioning in a promotional piece that we accept most insurance plans, I may mention that how we can provide family support, safety and injury prevention, or mental health.

MARKETING STRATEGY

Not only is promoting and sharing this information relevant and valuable to parents, but I also think it is an excellent way to differentiate ourselves from the MinuteClinics or other medical services that overlap with pediatrics (i.e. Urgent Centers, Family Practice, Telemedicine).

YOUR CHALLENGE

Think about your medical practice’s communication strategy, or lack thereof. What is your practices unique selling proposition? What problems do you solve that others don’t? Then think about how best to communicate your message. Also, consider the channels you’ll be delivering your message. By channels I mean, traditional advertising, email campaigns, social media, etc.

Remember, each channel is unique, thus requires you to craft the message differently.

I’ll leave you with this… times are changing. That is certain. And we have two options, two paths to choose from. Disagree with how things are changing, or find ways to agree with the shifts in a way that benefits you and your practice.

4 Simple Questions That Will Make You A Better Manager To Your Employees

As practice managers and administrators of both large and small practices, we are wired not to see our failures but instead see the shortfall of our employees and attempt to correct them. Nothing wrong with that. It’s part of management.

But let me challenge you on this one. The next time you have difficulties with an employee, take a moment and reflect how you are interpreting the issue using the questions above. Consider where you are placing the blame. On people’s character or the circumstances?

As humans, we have an uncanny ability to justify and explain situations in ways that benefit us.  For example…

When we observe a father shouting, tugging or being overpowering towards their child, we raise an eyebrow and pass judgement on that parent’s poor parenting skills.

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If we lose our temper with our kids, we justify it by blaming the circumstances. We’ll say, “if you knew how challenging my children are, you would understand.”

In a medical practice environment, it may go something like this.

Julie: Nancy is late again.
Michelle: That’s the way she is. She’s so disorganized.
Julie: I know. And she doesn’t take her job seriously.
Michelle: Bill has given her so many opportunities, but she seems not to get the message in that thick head of hers.

Let’s look at it from another viewpoint.

Julie: I’m sorry I’m late. It’s just that my car has been acting up. And with my husband being out of town, I have to get the 3-kids ready, drop them off at my mother-in-law’s house – you know she is still upset about that thing – and just as my luck will have it, there was a fender bender on Route 95 and traffic was backed up all the way to the freeway.

CHARACTER VS CIRCUMSTANCES

Medical practice managers and administrators tend to make similar judgements.

When we have an under-performing staff member, we question their work ethic, make claims about their lack of motivation, engagement or lack of interest. Simply put, we tend to judge their character.

When we fall short, we don’t dare blame our work ethic, lack of motivation or lack of interest. Instead we blame the circumstances.

For example, we’ll blame our underperforming employees, unreasonable parents, the healthcare system, insurance companies, the printer, the network, being overworked and our boss. She’s too demanding and has unrealistic expectations.

REVERSE

What if we reverse the tendency to blame circumstances when we fall short and blame people’s character faults when they make a mistake or underperform? What would it look like if you looked at your character when employees in your practice fall short?

To help you put all of this into perspective, think about a time in the practice when an employee was underperforming. Using that situation in mind, read and think about the four questions I’ve listed below.

1.- Am I measuring a fish by its ability to walk?

Everybody has their strengths, but if you place someone in an environment that is counter to their strengths, they will undoubtedly fail.

Before rushing to judgement, ask this question first. Have I done a disservice to the employee by placing them in a position that they are not naturally good at doing?

2.- Am I telling them instead of leading them?

The best leaders are not the best because of their title. The best leaders are remarkable because they have distinctive character traits. Thus, asking employees to think and see the way you think and see things is often unfair.

Instead of saying, why can’t they just… (they being employees) ask, have I led them?

Consider putting more efforts towards helping them understand – leading them – rather than expecting them to know.

3. – Am I assuming employees remember?

Just because you said it once, doesn’t mean it was heard or retained.

If an employee keeps overlooking necessary task for example, take pause and consider if the reason is that you have not made clear the importance of the tasks.

One important distinction to have present when reminding employees. It is more important to tell employees why their jobs matter than remind them how to do their jobs.

4. – What am I doing about it?

Some hires simply are not a good fit. Others don’t work out. You know that. The entire staff also knows that.

Keeping an employee around that doesn’t fit well into the culture, is disruptive, consistently underperforms, and makes mistakes despite coaching, is a failure of leadership.

In other words, an employee that is out of line is not necessarily your fault, but it is on you if they remain an employee of the practice.

As practice managers and administrators of both large and small practices, we are wired not to see our failures but instead see the shortfall of our employees and attempt to correct them. Nothing wrong with that. It’s part of management.

But let me challenge you on this one. The next time you have difficulties with an employee, take a moment and reflect how you are interpreting the issue using the questions above. Consider where you are placing the blame. On people’s character or the circumstances?