To Be Paid or Not to Be Paid

A pediatrician wouldn’t dismiss a parent’s hardship that hinders a child’s health because they know that the well-being of the child has a direct correlation to the well-being of the parents.

If the parents aren’t doing well (financially, emotionally, physically, etc), the child will have a hard time doing well as well. Thus, in order to appropriately provide care to patients, the parent issues need to be addressed first. Not doing so could be considered negligent.

This concept is no different in a “private” medical practice; whereas the wellbeing of the child is in direct correlation to the wellbeing of the practice’s welfare.

However many pediatricians don’t seem to grasp the concept that there is a direct correlation between the financial health of a practice and the welfare of patients.

Not addressing the revenue problems first is actually irresponsible and a disservice to patients. It is a responsibility to be profitable. Unless there are special circumstances, don’t offer a service that you don’t get paid for. Because doing so is also negligent.

3 thoughts on “To Be Paid or Not to Be Paid”

  1. I understand that when you’re running a business in which you take care of others, your own needs must be met first – it’s the same idea behind the instructions that you get on the use of oxygen masks whenever you fly the friendly skies. That said, one can easily argue that the profitability mantra has been taken into the extreme when basic healthcare services become unaffordable for close to a third of the US population. I think it all depends on how you define “profitable.” Practices must be self supporting. Beyond that, you’re quite possibly wading into ethically questionable territory when using the term “negligence.”
    +1

  2. I understand that when you’re running a business in which you take care of others, your own needs must be met first – it’s the same idea behind the instructions that you get on the use of oxygen masks whenever you fly the friendly skies. That said, one can easily argue that the profitability mantra has been taken into the extreme when basic healthcare services become unaffordable for close to a third of the US population. I think it all depends on how you define “profitable.” Practices must be self supporting. Beyond that, you’re quite possibly wading into ethically questionable territory when using the term “negligence.”

    1. JTaylor,

      I think you are confusing two separate issues. Healthcare cost is skyrocketing, but NOT because of pediatricians. Where I think you are getting things mix up, is confusing doctors’ profitability with insurance companies profitability. Premium hikes don’t come from doctors; they come from insurance companies. Keep that in mind. Also, consider how much pharmaceuticals make? Or medical equipment companies. That is Profit!

      Pediatrician’s are among the lowest paid physicians (look it up; it is well documented). And a visit to the pediatrician’s office is far, far less than an adult doc and definitely a lot less than a specialist office. Even when you consider vaccines, which account for a good portion of the expenses – it is still cheaper than to get an illness like polio or chicken pox.

      When I refer to profitability in a medical private practice, I’m talking about having more money come in that actually goes out.

      Yes, I do consider it negligent when a physician is actually “loosing” money providing services for patient because sooner or later, she/he’s patient won’t be able to get care if he/she goes out of business.

      And here lies the reason why I wrote the post, profitability is not a dirty word in a private medical practice. And certainly not “unethical” as you suggested.

      If our practice isn’t making “profits” I can’t afford to hire the best doctors with the best training; I can’t buy the best equipment to help my docs diagnose complex medical issues or hire highly qualified (highly expensive) medical staff such as nurses, medical assistants and associated providers.

      It is our our duty to be “profitable.” Are patients actually depend on it.

      Thank you for your comments.

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